Diwali Festival of Lights: Worship of Lakshmi

Lakshmi is worshiped throughout Diwali Festival of Lights

Lakshmi is no doubt worshiped throughout the year as the important Hindu Goddess of Wealth, but she is most astutely worship during the Hindu festival of Diwali, festival of lights.  Diwali is a very important 5-day holiday on the Hindu calendar in which families celebrate traditional activities together in their homes.  Participants in Diwali light small clay oil lamps which represents the conquering of good over evil.  The lamps are left lit throughout the night as followers cleanse their homes in order to welcome Goddess Lakshmi.  Throughout history people have put oil lamps outside their homes on Diwali in hopes that Lakshmi would come visit their homes and bless them.  Lakshmi Puja is the most important day of the Diwali festival of lights in northern India.  Fireworks are set off in order to send away evil spirits.  Sweets and snacks are shared among family and friends and an overall grand celebration ensues.

View all our Lakshmi Goddess of Wealth Statues

It is no question that the Diwali festival is a celebration of great joy for Hindus, honoring Lakshmi’s abundance in their lives.  Lakshmi is an endless symbol of wealth in all its forms.  Wealth comes in many ways, not just the monetary wealth we think of.  She is a symbol of wealth of knowledge, wealth of courage, wealth of victory, and every other way in which wealth manifests.  Thus she is celebrated for her endless abundance.  Lakshmi is a symbol of luck to most Hindus and is celebrated daily in most homes.  She is a symbol of femininity for Hindu women with her gorgeous golden complexion sitting upon a blooming lotus bud.   The budding lotus represents fertility and purity.  She is believed to lead devotees into both material and spiritual prosperity.

As October is coming to a close, many Hindus are prepping for Diwali to start on the 13th of November, celebrated through the 17th of November.  Prep your oil lamps and prepare to celebrate with Hindus across the globe and celebrate the diving beauty Lakshmi, Hindu Goddess of Wealth.

Hindu God Shiva as Harihara

Glory to you, O Shiva! Glory to you, O Omkaara! May Brahma, Vishnu and the assembly of other gods, including the great Lord Shiva, relieve me of my afflictions!

Hindu God Shiva

View all our Shiva Statues including this stunning bronze meditating Shiva.

As many know, Hindu God Shiva comes in many different forms.  One such popular form is that of Shiva as Harihara, an important integration between Hindu God Shiva and Hindu God Vishnu.  The worship of Shiva as Harihara is an important form as it reiterates to devotees that worship of Shiva, Vishnu, or any of the prominent Hindu Gods is but the worship of every prominent Hindu God, one and the same.  When one worships Shiva, one also worships Vishnu, and all the other important deities collectively in the spirit of divine oneness.  All followers of Hinduism are all looking for one thing, the divine.  When one comes to fully realize this concept, they understand that we are all worshiping the same inherent thing, dharma, just from different approaches.  Both Vishnavites and Shaivities worship Harihara as a form of the one supreme god.

There is often much debate within Hinduism as to the inherent importance of Shiva and Vishnu.  Vishnavites believe that Vishnu is the supreme god, while Shaivities believe Shiva to be the ultimate being.  Conversely others believe that both are equal, manifesting different aspects of the same Supreme Being.   In many cases, however, even if one is preferred over the other, much respect is allotted to the other.

“Shiva and Vishnu are one and the same entity. They are essentially one and the same. They are the names given to the different aspects of the all-pervading Supreme Soul or the Absolute. ‘Sivasya hridayam vishnur-vishnoscha hridayam sivah—Vishnu is the heart of Siva and likewise Siva is the heart of Vishnu’.”

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SHIVA AND VISHNU

Hindu Goddess Saraswati: Goddess of Knowledge

“May Goddess Saraswati, who is fair like the jasmine-colored moon, and whose pure white garland is like frosty dew drops, who is adorned in radiant white attire, on whose beautiful arm rests the veena, and whose throne is a white lotus, who is surrounded and respected by the Gods, protect me. May you fully remove my lethargy, sluggishness, and ignorance.”

Within Hinduism, Saraswati is the Goddess of knowledge, art, music, and science. Companion to Brahma, it is said that Saraswati was key to his creation of the Universe.  As his source of vital spirit and energy, she along with Goddess Kali and Lakshmi played pivotal roles in helping the gods shape and maintain the universe.  Saraswati also plays an important role in Buddhism as sacred devotee of Gautama Buddha making sure his teachings live on in practice.   She is daughter to Durga and sister to Ganesh.

Click here to view all our Saraswati Statues

Saraswati is thought to contain the divine flow of all things serving as a beautiful body of knowledge and catalyst of learning throughout the world.  Her sultry appearance is striking and the epitome of feminine and divine beauty.  Her beauty is strategic in order to make knowledge and learning alluring to onlookers.  She is often depicted in flowing white to symbolize her purity and unmatched mind while seated upon a lotus flower which represents the light in knowledge.  By worshiping Saraswati one is able to realize the possibility of infinite knowledge and an endless quest of enrichment.  She embodies not only knowledge itself, but the highest of spiritual knowledge, much like Buddhist teaching of the Gautama Buddha reaching enlightenment.  Her potential is fully realized and as one follows her example they too can become enlightened.

Many devotees believe strongly in offering honey to goddess Saraswati during worship as a symbol of the purest of knowledge.

Click to learn more about Hindu goddess Saraswati.

 

The Hindu Goddess Shailputri, Uma Parvati

“Worship of Shailaputri gives Stability, Health, Spiritual Awareness, Love, Compassion and Dignity.”

The Hindu Goddess Shailaputri, Uma Parvati

View Statues of the Hindu Goddess Shailaputri, Uma Parvati. Above is a stunning bronze of Parvati with her two sons Ganesh and Murugan.

The first form of the Hindu Goddess mother Durga among her nine forms is Shailaputri. ‘Shail’ means mountains. ‘Putri’ means daughter. As such she is the Daughter of the Mountains, popularly known as Uma-Parvati in Puranic mythology.

The Hindu Goddess Shailputri is venerated on the first day of the Navaratri prayers. She is said to be the embodiment of the power of the Hindu Gods Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva. She is described as Hindu Goddess Parvati, the consort of Lord Shiva and the mother of Ganesha and Murugan.

Shailaputri was born to Daksha Prajapati. Once Daksha had organized a big Yagna and did not invite Shiva. But Sati being obstinate, reached there against Siva’s advise. Thereupon Daksha insulted Shiva. Sati could not tolerate the insult of husband and burnt herself in the fire of Yagna. Shiva carried her and shook the world with his Thandava. Seeing his agony, Lord Vishnu used his sudharsana chakra to dismember the corpse. They fall on to the earth and became Shakti Peeths. In her next birth, Sati, became the daughter of Himalaya as Parvati. In the Nava Durga pantheon she is referred as Shailaputri.

Worship of Shivalingam: Infinite Cylinder of Auspiciousness

View all our Hindu God Shiva Statues

Although Hindu God Shiva is most often depicted in human like form, the worship of Shiva as lingam or linga is also a very important practice within Hindu society.  Shiva is often worshiped in the form of a vertical rounded column.  Within Hinduism linga means symbol while Shiva is thought to be one who is all knowing.  Therefore, Shivalinga stands as a symbol for the great God of the universe who is all-auspicious.

Within the Shivalinga Hindus believe lays all the knowledge of the universe.  Since hindus believe one god creates, sustains, and draws back the universe the Shivalinga is a symbol of God himself.  This symbolism was brought to life in the Vedas where devotees sung praise to a sacrificial post.

View all our beautiful Lingam Statues

This Lingam is used for worship in temples throughout the world.  Many debate whether the lingam is actually a symbol of the actual body of Shiva himself, or simply as a spiritual metaphor for the all-knowing God.  Most Hindus believe it is a source of divine energy, and give offerings to the linga in their temples.  The Lingam is said to be a limitless and endless pillar symbolizing the infinite.